Is My Anger Righteous? 

God calls us to be angry about the right things.

By Paul David Tripp, Guest Contributor 

It’s unavoidable: this week you were angry. Everyone was in some way. When you look back on your anger, what do you see? 

The prophet Micah writes, “He has shown you, O mortal, what is good. And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God” (Micah 6:8). This passage calls us to a lifestyle of righteous anger. 

But how do we know if our anger is considered “righteous” by God?  

Righteous anger is selfless

In Micah 6:8, the Lord requires us to 1) act justly, 2) love mercy, and 3) walk humbly.  

Ask yourself: What will cause me to act justly? Is it not righteous indignation at the perversion of justice, which causes innocent people to suffer and permits the guilty to go free? What will cause me to respond to others in mercy? Is it not anger at the suffering around me in this broken world? If I want to be part of what God is doing, will I not hate what He hates? 

If I want to be part of what God is doing, will I not hate what He hates?

Suffering must not be okay with us. Injustice must not be okay with us. The immorality of the culture around us must not be okay with us. The deceit of the atheistic worldview, the philosophical paradigm of many culture-shaping institutions, must not be okay with us. 

Righteous anger should yank us out of selfish passivity. Righteous anger should call us to join God’s revolution of grace. It should propel us to do anything we can to lift the load of people’s suffering, through the zealous ministry of the gospel of Jesus Christ, and to bring them into the freedom of God’s truth. 

Righteous anger is compassionate

What does this holy anger look like? It’s kind and compassionate. It’s tender and giving. It’s patient and persevering. It’ll make your heart open and your conscience sensitive. 

Though you are busy, it will cause you to slow down and pay attention. It’ll cause you to expand the borders of your concern beyond you and yours. It’ll cost you money, time, energy, and strength. It’ll fill your schedule and complicate your life. It’ll mean sacrifice and suffering. 

When your anger is righteous, you won’t be content with comfort and ease. When you’re both good and angry, you won’t fill your life so full meeting your own needs or realizing your own ministry dreams that you’ve little time for being God’s tool to meet the needs of others. 

But all of this requires a fight. Not a fight with people or social movements or political institutions. No, this is an internal fight. It’s a fight for the heart.  

Kindness, compassion, gentleness, mercy, love, patience, and grace don’t come naturally to us. They only come when powerful, transforming grace progressively wins the fight for our hearts. Only grace can win the fight between God’s will and our will, between God’s plan and our plan, between God’s desire and our desire, and between God’s sovereignty and our quest for self-rule. As long as sin still lives in our hearts, this fight rages in every situation and location of our lives. 

Only grace can win the fight between God’s will and our will.

Righteous anger desires good

If we’re ever going to be tools of the gracious anger of a righteous and loving God, we must begin by admitting the coldness and selfishness of our own hearts. We must cry out for the rescue that only His grace can give. We must pray for seeing eyes and willing hearts. We must make strategic decisions to put ourselves where need exists. We must determine to slow down so that when opportunities for mercy present themselves, we’re not too distracted or too busy. 

Most of all, those of us who’ve been called to represent the character and call of God in local church ministry need to pray that we would be righteously angry. We must pray that a holy zeal for what’s right and good would so fill our hearts that the evils greeting us daily would not be okay with us. 

We must be agitated and restless until His kingdom has finally come, and His will is finally being done on earth as it is in heaven. 

We must pray that we’d be angry in this way until there’s no reason to be angry anymore. And we must be vigilant, looking for every opportunity to express the righteous indignation of justice, mercy, wisdom, grace, compassion, patience, perseverance, and love. We must be agitated and restless until His kingdom has finally come, and His will is finally being done on earth as it is in heaven. For the sake of God’s honor and His kingdom, we must determine to be good and angry at the same time. 

As you look back on your week, evaluate your anger: Did your anger result from building your temporary kingdom or seeking God’s eternal kingdom? Did your anger propel you to be a healer, a restorer, a rescuer, and a reconciler? Or did your anger leave a legacy of fear, hurt, disappointment, and division? 

God calls you to be good, and He calls you to be angry at the same time. This broken world desperately needs people who will answer His call. 

Paul David Tripp

Dr. Paul David Tripp (M.Div, Westminster Theological Seminary), a longtime fan of BSF, is a pastor, speaker, and award-winning author known for the bestselling everyday devotional New Morning Mercies. He and his wife, Luella, recently celebrated 50 years of marriage. They live in Philadelphia and have four adult children and six grandchildren.

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142 Comments

  1. Now I understand: my anger has been unrighteous.
    Internal complaining and blaming others has been selfishly ruling my heart for sometime and l didn’t know.
    God bless you for this revelation.

    Reply
  2. I aspire to lead a life that aligns with God’s purpose on earth. I am grateful for your comprehensive message, as it has aided in my self-reflection and guided me toward fulfilling my role as a messenger of God.

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  3. I understand the writer in regards to anger, anger is defined as “a strong feeling of displeasure or hostility.
    Grief; trouble; distress; anguish”. Anger does apply to the feelings when we ponder and view the state of the culture and this world. It must be used productively through the Holy Spirit given to us and pleasing to our Heavenly Father. Anger that produces rage and vengeance is not a quality from our Lord and Savior, this is when it is used unproductively and is not of course Christ like. Humans do get angry, the bible states in Ephesians 4:26 states: in your anger do not sin, which to me means feel it as an emotional response as a human, think it through while processing it, more importantly, ask yourself what does the scriptures say about anger and how the word of God can be applied to the feeling of anger and then as Christians we will be moving in the right direction.

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  4. This is so good, I’m saving it so that I can refresh my mind and heart over and over.

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  5. I respectfully disagree that God calls us to anger. Though I have not specifically studied the topic of anger in depth, I have looked into what God’s Word says about anger before and am convinced the Bible makes it clear that humans are incapable of an anger that is totally righteous. God is capable of that but not us. The book of James says, “…for the anger of man does not produce the righteousness of God.”
    (James 1:20 ESV)

    I do, however, agree that God clearly calls us to “…do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God”
    (Micah 6:8b ESV) as the author of the blog mentioned. And I agree that we should definitely not be ok or apathetic about injustices in the world, suffering, sin, or anything else God is not ok with. But love—unselfish, Christ-like love—for God and for people (even those who feel like enemies), as well as Jesus who lives in us, is sufficient to be our motivation to not be complacent or apathetic. We should leave “righteous anger” to God–the only One truly capable of such a thing–and we should let love (as God defines love) be the driving force of our passion and motivation instead where doing justice, loving kindness, and walking humbly with God are concerned. And in all things for that matter! 🙂

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  6. Although I did not see, it specifically, walking humbly with God means to realize that He is in control of everything, not us.

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  7. At some point in time, God’s righteous anger will reach an apex. Unlike with the Amorites whose iniquity was not full, i. e. sin had not reached its full measure as in Genesis 15. But like the time when God’s spirit will no longer strive with man as in Genesis 6. Though our God is long-suffering, his patience will have run its course. So judgment will come

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  8. Angry enough to compassionately help, not to hurt!

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  9. Would you consider John The Baptist’s anger Righteous? He surely wasn’t calm and he didn’t weigh his words. He was ANGRY.

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    • Yes, he .olive for “preparing the Way for Jesus” was not selfish.

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  10. Thank you. I Ask the Holy Spirit to help me to stop the wrath that s’not point to the sake of m’y Lord and King Jésus . May l thank about His kingdom

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  11. Thanks for the words of wisdom regarding anger.

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  12. I have been angry because of the injustice at work, it kept me from praying right, this article helped me realize i was in the wrong because clearly i wanted justice to satisfy me and not God’s will for my life.

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  13. I really enjoyed what you had to say about anger. Thank you for sharing God’s Word with us.

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  14. Thank you for sharing this! I especially found the second to last paragraph a measurable call to self evaluation of one’s personal anger.

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  15. This blog post confuses the emotion of anger with a conviction of the wrongness of a thing that is prone, initially, to cause anger, and a commitment to action to resolve that situation.

    So-called “righteous” anger is most normally a rationalization that attempts to justify our emotional upset and the (usually harmful) actions we take while in its grip, and to shift the blame for the consequences back to the situation that made us angry.

    In Galatians 5:20 Paul describes anger [“wrath”] as a “work of the flesh,’ and continuing, “they which do such things shall not inherit the kingdom of God.” He implicitly contrasts such works of the flesh with the fruits of the Holy Spirit, including peace, patience, goodness, kindness, and gentleness.

    Anger is prone to lead to hasty, rash, ill-considered action to eliminate the situation that provokes our anger. Generally, such action creates reactions in others that expand the zone and duration of conflict.

    Most normally, only after we have surrendered our anger to God’s control, resolved to trust Him with all our heart, (rather than to rely on our own understanding and action), will we experience the peace to listen for the whispers of the Holy Spirit, guidance that will make our path(s) straight, and lead us to effective solutions for the basic problem.

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    • Thank you for your comment, Bill. I was confused a bit with the blog. It sounds hard to do.

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    • Thank you Bill for posting your sentiment in words I could not so clearly articulate regarding what the pastor wrote about righteous anger.
      It’s nice to know this is a safe space to express a different opinion or take on things.

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    • I also thank you for your comments, Bill. I strongly agree with what you said and really appreciate that you took the time to write what you did. And I also really appreciate it that you wrote it in the way that you did (in a respectful and Christ-like way).

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  16. A great insight on righteous anger. I would also call it compassionate anger, merciful anger…. that spurns me into action., to love as God commands.

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  17. Thank You so much for this information. Someone said to me today that God does not want us to be angry. I asked the person what about righteous anger. In will be sharing this with her.

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    • We ought to emulate Jesus Christ, slow to anger, fierce in anger and Love.

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    • It is true that Christ experienced anger this cannot be sin, since He was without sin. But I think anger can quickly turn into hate, and hatred is evil. So instead we should be passionate, tenacious, determined … to love as Jesus loved. Nobody ever took advantage of him. No-one gained the upper hand against Christ. Those who killed him only contributed to the fulfilment of his destiny. Injustice was not able to have a negative effect on him, and sin or wrongdoing never hindered his life.

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  18. Finally. Thank you both for standing firm. I read this last week and have been sick over this. What causes someone to act justly is not anger over something. Feeling are never to be the rationale for acting. To act justly is to be obedient to the truth written in G-d’s Word. We can’t know the truth unless it is read and understood – not felt. This is bending scripture and the reader towards their own feelings and psychological issues, instead of to the character and the person of G-d, the problem of sin, the need for repentance, and praise to G-d for what Jesus accomplished and how He is changing us and bringing us into the knowledge of the truth.

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  19. I didn’t agree with this blog post. It started with his statement that Micah 6:8 “calls us to a lifestyle of righteous anger”. That’s really reading into it to make a point that he wants to make. I believe most human anger is not “righteous”. Jesus could be angry and without sin, but most of us can’t handle it. Self gets in the way. Also, he says “We must pray that we’d be angry in this way until there’s no reason to be angry anymore.” Number one, nowhere in the Bible have I ever seen a prompting to “pray to be angry”. Also, his statement says that we should remain angry until there’s no reason to be angry anymore. This world will be fallen until Christ comes again. Nothing we do will “fix” this world and turn it into a utopia. I wish BSF would just stick with the study we’re doing and the truths we’re gleaning from the Word, not from a Guest Contributor.

    Reply
    • Colleen.
      I didn’t agree with the last sentence. I believe the Guest Contributor’s message was sieved by the BSF Leaders who must have concluded that it was beneficial for us in addition to the main stream Study.
      God bless you BSF team at the Headquarters.

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  20. Well, this will be one for “God’s timing is perfect”. Long story short, I had just been a target of a scam, where I was told I needed to pay $1500 in fines to the Co. Sheriff Dept. and I was actually starting to follow their instructions, they were the Sheriff’s dept. right, I didn’t give them any secure information, they actually had some correct information on me, anyway God got my attention, and I called our County Office and asked them if these fines were real. The first words out of the clerk’s mouth were that is a scam! I got back on my mobile phone because these guys were actually waiting on the phone for me to drive down to the Co. Office and pay (they had the correct County Office address). I confronted them and told them they were scammers and to go do something good with their life! Then I remembered the email on anger. I did not fall into any of the proper ways to respond. I was so mad. I even thought about calling my brother-in-law because he likes to turn the table on these people and lead them on. At the moment, I have all that you shared swirling around in my head along with anger in my heart of being fooled, but thanks be to God in His perfect timing I have godly wisdom to guide and direct my thoughts and heart.

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    • Hi Julie,
      A similar thing happened to me. I felt angry also.
      However it is true that the anger of man does not produce the righteousness of God. I say give them all the attention they deserve (which is none 🙂

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  21. I sense the battle raging between my will for myself and God‘s holy will. Trusting. His grace will be sufficient… The following paragraph was such a help: Kindness, compassion, gentleness, mercy, love, patience, and grace don’t come naturally to us. They only come when powerful, transforming grace progressively wins the fight for our hearts. Only grace can win the fight between God’s will and our will, between God’s plan and our plan, between God’s desire and our desire, and between God’s sovereignty and our quest for self-rule. As long as sin still lives in our hearts, this fight rages in every situation and location of our lives.

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  22. Thank you for this article. It was very helpful as I seek to learn more about God and his word.

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  23. Now did I need to read this.
    Last night I was angry at my husband. And I shouldn’t have.
    I’m going to try to not be angry the way I’ve been in the past but to be angry with love behind it!!
    Thank you

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  24. I’m so thankful to have just read your blogpost with Dr. Tripp. Will be passing on this wisdom to my significant others and friends as well!

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  25. Thank you I have learned more about being angry but wanting to do express kindness in expressing what is making my feel that way and I will be sure to pray for guidance in this matter ..an eye opener for sure .

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  26. Thank you for helping me to better understand the meaning of Ephesians 4:26, “Be ye angry and sin not.”

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  27. Good to know righteous anger produces compassion, love and zeal for God’s kingdom to prosper! Amen!

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  28. Righteous anger is God’s attribute. Only by grace can I be loving and compassionate yet angry at the evil in this world. My prayer is that God would continually regenerate my heart until I can manifest His attributes towards mankind.

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  29. So you are saying righteous anger should compel us to share the gospel more broadly, but what about in my family where adult kids have decidedly left the faith flatly saying they don’t want to hear it and glaze over anytime The Word is spoken, Yet want acceptance for their chosen identities, which the church would call immoral.

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    • Julie, I feel your pain. My wife and I have a daughter, now 51, who, from 8th grade was rebellious and wanted nothing to do with church or God. In fact, as she got older she was actually consciously RUNNING from Him and any thoughts about a belief in Jesus. All we could do was keep her in our prayers, quite honestly, to be truthful, I wondered if God was even listening. But we know differently, praise be to God! Because in His perfect timing, after years of living in darkness, God had had enough of our daughters running from Him. In one of those 180-degree, miracle moments only God can orchestrate, our daughter was transformed by the light of His Grace into His daughter whom He loves perfectly. She was transformed into a person with faith that only could have come from Him. She continues to this day loving Him, with a heart for Jesus and a mission for helping those out of the old life she once led. Continue praying for your children that He would finish the work in their hearts that he began and never give up!

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    • They don’t want to hear but they want to be loved. Love them but not their sins nor their immoral chosen identities; the same way as God loves each of us – undeserved sinners.

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  30. Thank you, Dr. Paul David Tripp. It helps me understand clearly that “God calls you to be good, and He calls you to be angry at the same time”.

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  31. Well said. Thank you for the timely comments on anger!

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  32. This article encourages me to pray more vigilantly for God to help me with expressing rightous anger coupled with mercy, grace and truth. Thank you .

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  33. I am only too challenged by my anger, typically in evenings (with my children’s disobedience) and my extreme chronic fatigue. Thank you for your encouragement to ask the question, did your anger leave a legacy of fear and disappointment? Good question! TY for your insights and writings.

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  34. So enlightening & well explained. So appreciate this biblical instruction on righteous anger as it is something we daily deal with. May God show me all the areas of my heart that need to be examined & changed. God’s continued blessings to you for sharing this & hopefully more enlightening truths to help us each grow more Christ like.🙏

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  35. This was good to read. I am currently reading your book “War of Words” Getting to the heart of your communication struggles.

    This book has been eye opening and I am taking it slowly to absorb as much as I can.

    Thank you for writing this book.

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  36. I loved the piece Mr. Trip did about Righteous Anger. I really had to think about what upsets me in this world today & would GOD approve.

    I like that we (BSFers) we’re sent this. Can we look forward to more, I pray?

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  37. Dr Tripp,

    Your words were a such a blessing for me. The eloquence of your words were only eclipsed by how you framed your message. I felt the power of the message and of your own righteous indignation.

    Please, keep them coming.

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    • This message could not be more timely regarding righteous anger … how we as God fearing, God honoring , lovers of Jesus Christ should base our actions and responses to the swirling concepts in which we are daily confronted.
      Thank you for sharing with us serving in BSF.

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  38. I just came back to the church after a 15 year recovery from a head on collision on the freeway. In the journey I faced hunger, being poor, ostracized behadue to disabilities. I couldn’t read my Bible, remember scriptures, and could not attend church.

    Much humility, great desire to know the Lord.

    I have come back to church to find strong racism, huge buckets of self righteousness.

    So much that I am broken completely with the behavior of the Christians.

    Today I’m not attending BSF and did not go back to church last Sunday. I need to process what I have experienced.

    The self righteousness is staggering.

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    • Susan – praying you find a church home that can help you heal and discover the abounding love of Jesus! Thank you for sharing

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    • So sorry this has been your experience and pray (right now) you find a church that is truly after Christ’s heart as I know there are many! More importantly, we can’t look to people to satisfy our hunger for Christ, but only Christ himself. We are a broken, imperfect people in need of a Savior. So, fix your eyes on Him.

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    • So sorry that u had to go thru this head injury I too was in a car accident and took many years for complete recovery, there are many churches to choose from if u r not happy with the one u went too pray ask God to lead you to another one, remember we r all sinners fallen people we need to admit this, and turn to Jesus for forgiveness and help in our times of need, we all need one another confess our faults to one another and be healed….Remember God loves you even when you and I sin.

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      • Always good to remember that the interpretation/definition of a word varies bc of experiences/emotions attached. To some receiving or having anger might be terrifying. To others it might be a flag to reflect on the reason you feel agitated. It can be displeasure which we all should have when we commit or witness sin. Or it could be rage if we saw someone being beaten. It is a human emotion. The point is that we don’t nurse it or refuse to heal. If that is the case it will spiral into bitterness and revenge. It is a sign of maturity to be angry at the right time in the right way at the right thing for the right reason. So I guess anger is like any other emotion. It must be recognized and responded to but not necessarily acted out on without good reason. It would be sad to be numb to certain circumstances as well as foolish to rush into something without good reason. We are not robots nor are we God all knowing. But He did create us in His image. That includes emotions.

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  39. I think being good and angry needs more of a definition of angry. Application will vary depending upon context. I think the part where you stated a sensitive conscience could be unpacked more. Like a conscience that is pricked so often that you can barely lift yourself up; this kind of anger. Where the weight pressed down is so much that anger, as in reactionary anger, is fleeting, and you have to tell yourself that this is wrong, something is unjust. Where love crushes you so much that if you’re not careful you call good evil and evil good.Was it really good that Jesus was crucified? And about then is when your anger makes you fall to your knees, and want to wash Jesus feet with your tears.

    Honestly the context of application can be so varied and personal that I would guess a relationship with God is vital to be able to express righteous anger. But I do want heaven on earth. May His kingdom come, His will be done. May all glory be to Him. I will trust and obey, God-willing.

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  40. Such a great article as I’m just beginning the journey with our church through “LivingUndivided”! Thank you.

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  41. “We must make strategic decisions to put ourselves where need exists. We must determine to slow down so that when opportunities for mercy present themselves, we’re not too distracted or too busy.” This really spoke to me. Thank you Lord for prompting me again!

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  42. This is wrong and biblically inaccurate. I am concerned with the premise that we are allowed to be angry. Please show me ONE passage that tells us that we are authorized to be angry, righteous or otherwise. Even the verse that’s quoted here mentions nothing about being angry. We cannot be angry because we have a sin nature! Jesus was the only one that could have righteous anger because HE was the only one righteous. How could we possibly square this teaching with any of the following passages?
    Ps 37:8, Pr 14:29, Pr 15:18, Pr 22:24, Pr 29:22, Ecc 7:9, Col 3:8, 1Tim 2:8, and Jas 1:19-20
    Even when we throw around “Be angry and do not sin…” (Eph 4:26) as a justification to be angry, we totally disregard what it says 5 verses later in 4:31: “Let ALL bitterness and wrath and anger and clamor and slander be put away from you, along with malice.” We are called to act differently than the world, to be unoffendable. Your anger is not a catalyst that will produce the righteousness of God but satisfy your human nature and sin. We are to pray and take action, while living at peace with everyone (see Rom 12:9-21). If anger is something you struggle with, read the book Unoffendable by Brant Hansen. And for your sake, don’t listen to this.

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    • Mercy. Having tried to stuff anger – authorized or not – causes great emotional and psychological harm. Teachings such as yours welcomes the devil to wreck havoc in our hearts and relationships. It is a human emotion and spoken of as something actually natural, albeit sinful as we are all sinners. The verses I read all point to it is going to happen, but how to handle it in a manor that honors God and our relationship with man. We are not God, we are not perfect, and we have the human emotions He blessed us with. We will be offendable either intentionally or unintentionally. Your response could be considered offendable. I am so thankful when I do have angry responses to injustice in this world (my neighbor’s daughter being attacked by a reckless dog owner, leaving her with multiple wounds on her legs, arm & face; a parent berating their child in public; a person who freely and repeated lies to make themself look better; elder abuse, & the list goes on!), I know my God is just as angry because He is Holy and Good and Compassionate. Mr. Tripp’s article is helping us see it is ok to be upset with the things that upset Him, and hopefully we listen when the Holy Spirit shows us how to respond as He would, in ways that honor Him. Grace, please.

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      • I get it that anger is a human emotion that we have to deal with, but you still haven’t provided a scriptural reference to our anger being a good thing that we are called to experience. Anger, in any form, is just an extension of our pride and selfishness. We can know the heart of God, but because of our nature we can never emulate His righteousness. We are made righteous by Christ’s action, not ours. Even in Eph. 4:25-32, it clearly says that we will be angry (as this is our human nature), but it also with the utmost clarity tells us to get rid of all bitterness, rage and anger. Then look at verse 32 and tell me how we are supposed to reconcile our anger. Please, as one who was prone to anger and justifying it as righteous, understand what the Bible is saying and what Pastor Tripp is communicating and ask yourself: if I was completely objective, which is the path that honors God?

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      • By the way, I never said stuff anger….. we are called to forgive. Let it go and be done with anger because a man’s anger does not produce the righteousness of God.

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    • I have read Dr. Tripp’s challenge to assert a righteous anger towards human suffering, cultural and moral decline, and injustice in our broken world.
      Then I read Brian’s response. At age, almost 90, I lean strongly toward Brian’s view. I do not have the perfect righteousness that God has. I do not have His omnipotence, His omniscience, nor His omnipresence. Yes, we have the resident Holy Spirit within us, and yes, I can quote Romans 8: 28, however, my energies are primarily spent in trying to live a life that glorifies God, a life that enlarges my sanctification to be more Christ-like, to be loving to my wife, my family, my neighbor.
      I am saddened by peoples needless suffering and disgusted with the moral, spiritual, social, and political decline I see in America. Perhaps you could say it angers me.
      If I am called upon to offer help, I do that through my tithe, contributing food to the food bank, changing a strangers tire, shoveling snow for my widow neighbor, voting in elections, etc. Well, obviously this isn’t enough in terms of righteous anger. I feel I’m not measuring up to the call to “God’s revolution of grace”, as Tripp states.
      I, like us all, am a sinner saved by grace. I am quite familiar with my short commings, my sinful nature. Romans 7:15-20 is familiar to me. Now Dr. Tripp says, shape up here my boy! You are not doing enough, you are falling way to far short of the mark. You must drum up some righteous anger and turn this fallen world around.
      Woe is me …. come soon Lord Jesus!

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      • I agree Richard. I am just saddened that so many Christians are encouraged by someone telling them to be angry?!? This is almost the antithesis of what the Bible is telling us. Personally, it really says something that the words they use to justify their attitudes are from a pastor and NOT THE BIBLE itself. No one has been able to clearly quote a single scripture that says what Dr. Tripp is presenting is God- honoring! We should be looking at Proverbs 21:2, “Every way of a man is right in his own eyes, but the LORD weighs the heart.”

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  43. “We must be agitated…..; until his kingdom has finally come….” What a teaching principle to meditate on for Lent. Thank You

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  44. Thanks. This caused me to do a self evaluation. I will save this to read and pray for transformation in my heart.

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    • Dr. Paul David Tripp
      Presents fresh Biblical insight to the subject. When I read the Scriptures in the blog they read me back to me.
      It spoke to my heart and promotes self reflection in the mirror of God’s Word
      Thanks “for making it plain” as they say in some circles.

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  45. What a challenge to my status quo. I didn’t even know that one could safely practice holy anger? Thank you for the insights.

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  46. Thank you for that understanding

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  47. Wow! I’ve never read or heard any commentary on anger like this. The message is both inspiring and thought-provoking. I am so encouraged to examine my own heart to see what type of anger is there and to let God change my heart to look more like him in this area. This mesage is so insightful. I think I need to read this to my family as well. What a great word.

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    • This was a powerful exposition on anger. Now I understand that anger is not necessarily a sin but an emotion that can lead to good.

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  48. Thank you for putting this out.
    Used it for my devotions today.
    Now I need time to process this.
    That is a good thing.
    Thank you.

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  49. Simply put……I needed to read these words of encouragement and direction today! Gods word is life saving and life changing. Thanks be to God.

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  50. I was blessed this morning from the message of being righteously angry. It caused me to see myself in a different light. Actually, I never thought of myself as being selfish, but I see that I am. Rather than concentrating solely on building the ministry I’m personally involved with, I need to also focus on those outside who are in need as well. I need to move away from the distractions so I can hear from God, to listen to who and where He wants me to help.

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  51. Thank you for this word. The Holy Spirit helped me to grasp the truth that a Christian can be “angry and sin not.”
    However, we must realize that this kind of anger is not being angry with someone because we didn’t like something they said or did. I definitely understood this! Thank you again.

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  52. Well written. I love the statement…,, “Only grace can win the fight between God’s will and our will.”

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  53. Thank you for the article. It was very helpful

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  54. Thank you for sharing. I agree and ask for prayer that I accept this in my heart, mine, body and soul. To be better. Thank you God in Jesus name I pray. Amen,Amen and Amen.

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  55. Power word well I was never angry person as I got older I take my time to read my quiet time every night and day I take to God in prayer that if I get like that

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  56. Dr. Tripp, on the other hand; perhaps only Jesus should have that ‘Righteous Anger’, He alone is God. When anger rises up in me, it is not a good thing. And, I agree that the battle is in my heart. My response to the inconsistencies and ungodliness should always be that of love (present company included). His Holy Spirit is Fruitfulness that others can taste and see that He is Good.

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    • Absolutely!

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  57. O, Lord, you are so true. You literally hear every tearful prayer of your chosen servant.
    Powerful message, so timely. Especially for BSF members in US California. Thank you Dr. Paul David Tripp.

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  58. I am over joyed with this passage,two days ago my friend and I were discussing about anger,n all the questions we had are answered on this email.I am blessed beyond my imagination

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  59. I needed this clarification at such a time as this that God wants me to be angry and good at the same time and the motive of my anger.it has helped me in something that is happening in my life now.
    Thankyou and God bless

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  60. Thank you for explaining anger in a Godly way. In this time and era we avoid but feel angry at the worldly leadership. Need for sincerity in prayer.

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  61. Thanks Dr Tripp.
    My take home is that Righteous anger is selfless other than selfish. It moves me from my comfort zone to allowing God’s will to prevail over my life and making every effort to work towards this even when it seems uncomfortable or challenging. So help me God.

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  62. Thank you for this convicting words of wisdom and direction. This blog is an answer of a question and prayer I have been asking God for a while. I had been struggling with anger. This blog brought light to my thinking and reasoning. I praise God for His goodness in answering my question so clearly throughout this blog.

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  63. You are calling for that which the awakening at Asbury is finding: repentance, purity, mercy, and grace.

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  64. Wow! I needed that message! It really made me think. Thanks!

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  65. Just the kind of stretch my heart needed tonight! Went to body stretch class this morning and now I’ve been spiritually stretched as well. Thank you!

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  66. People everywhere seem so hurried and so angry. This is a helpful essay to channel our zeal in godly pursuits.

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  67. Righteous anger leads to the Lord and His kingdom, self anger leads to destruction. Lord, please mold my heart to be like Yours! Amen!

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  68. Thank you so much for this powerful piece of writeup on anger against evil.

    God bless you

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  69. It’s so amazing to me how God knows exactly what we need and when we need it. I have been struggling with this very topic for weeks and this has really put it in perspective for me. This information is truly a Blessing!!

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  70. As you look back on your week, evaluate your anger: Did your anger result from building your temporary kingdom or seeking God’s eternal kingdom? Did your anger propel you to be a healer, a restorer, a rescuer, and a reconciler? Or did your anger leave a legacy of fear, hurt, disappointment, and division?
    What a lesson, so help us Lord, to be good and angry. Your way Lord, not mine 🙏

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  71. What a mighty Word! Lord God help me to be angry and good at the same time! This is so powerful and one I wish to enrobe my heart, mind and walk in daily. It is a stark reminder of what God is calling, we His people, to do. To be the light that shines so brightly that it cost us something, but more importantly, for all to see. Thank you so very much!!!!

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  72. wow really gave me a different perspective on anger- thank you sir!

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  73. Living with anger in my hearts, even righteous anger, is not healthy. When I experience righteous anger it should encourage me to act. I should work against injustice and evil. Through prayer and personal example I can speak the truth to a hurting world.

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    • YES!!!

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  74. Dr Tripp has given such clarity on righteous anger, what it is and isn’t. “ Did your anger propel you to be a healer, a restorer, a rescuer, and a reconciler? Or did your anger leave a legacy of fear, hurt, disappointment, and division?” This will certainly help me to analyse whenever I get angry in future and repent if it falls in the latter category.

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  75. Very fruitful thinking and way of dealing with anger I always trust god in eye action in my life
    But really sometimes on a quick moment of how to react that cause to be angry you don’t now what to do at the time you see people reacted in. Unfair to your good intentions of doing what is right ?????

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  76. But, when Jesus was righteously angry, he strode into the courtyard and turned over the tables of the vendors who were desecrating His Father’s “house if worship”. He didn’t just pat them on the head and forgive them? He ended their sin, with action.
    So, when are we to follow Jesus’ example?
    It seems that righteous anger requires action on our part?
    Please help my confusion?

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    • Jesus demonstrated His righteous anger from His righteousness. He could do this because He is the only person to ever be righteous. Because we have a sin nature, our righteous anger is actually an extension of our pride and selfishness. There are many passages in the Bible that tell us to get rid of ALL anger, but you won’t find any that say it is good for you to be angry…. not one. We read: in your anger, do not sin in Ephesians, but read just a few verses past this and see what it says about anger. Please do not be decieved.

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  77. Who can sustain in God’s wrath? I suppose the answer is no one.

    This year when we study the Divided Kingdom, The Lord was suffering continuously rebellions of His people, causing His wrath to build up and finally both kingdoms were exiled. This is quite an example of God’s wrath.

    We are blessed to be free of God’s wrath as our Lord has satisfied God’s wrath on The Cross. Hallelujah. God’s promise in Isaiah 54:9 is His guarantee under His own oath, similar to what He swore after Noah’s flood.

    But at the same time, we need to preach gospel to those who have not been free from God’s wrath. In fact, God’s wrath is imminent. The 7 seals, 7 trumpets, 7 bowls are all God’s judgments to satisfy His wraths according to The Book of Revelation, as well as to save Israelites, His covenant people who are still refusing Jesus as their Saviour. This is another plan of God that we can never think of. God’s wisdom is really unfathomable.

    Praise the Lord again for the coming Rapture to let us escape the 7 years of great tribulations (His time of pouring wraths). Hallelujah.

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  78. Anger is a practical test for where we really are in our process of sanctification. I discover that many times am angry over selfish reasons that have been coated with righteousness/God’s will. But Thanks Pastor Tripp for tracing out clearer marks of what and when it is unholy anger!

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  79. For years I have been a huge fan of New Morning Mercies and appreciated Dr. Tripp’s comments in this blog

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  80. really like the last part of the article on how to evaluate my anger with 3-4 great Qs! Very true and practical questions!!!

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  81. This dissertation by Dr. Paul Tripp is very encouraging & enlightening. The deteriorating decay evident in today’s world must be a concern to Christians & many others with a logical mindset. However, the real cure is through propagation of Christian belief through The Lord’s Word and effective prayer guiding our positive action & walk.

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  82. We must be agitated and restless until His kingdom has finally come, and His will is finally being done on earth as it is in heaven. That stood out for me.

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  83. Still not quite clear what gracious anger looks like. I would never accuse the church as a whole for being less than gracious. We need some righteous anger in our world at this time. Evil is getting out of control and too many are silent. I’m going to ere on making someone feel uncomfortable about their sin. That’s what Jesus has done for me!

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  84. Thank you for your wisdom in helping us evaluate our anger.

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  85. Thanks
    Good perspective on righteous anger ..will apply it in current geopolitical culture to give glory to God

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  86. This article hit me right in the chest. It is a lightbulb moment, and I have not felt like this for years. A few years back I felt something in my life was missing, and could not figure out what was wrong until I humbled myself before God and He revealed it to me. My life was good, and everything was going well. I forgot what was important, its not about my happy little kingdom, but a kingdom that’s everlasting reaching out to a starving world. You see, I was starving until God opened my eyes, and I was filled with joy reaching out to others who I had not noticed before. This year I want to move forward in what God is calling me to do, and this article has reminded me to not get comfortable doing nothing, give back what The Lord has given me, and that’s when I come alive.

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  87. Praise the LORD for His mercies that are new every morning! We are a peculiar people who express the justice, mercy, wisdom, grace, compassion, perseverance, patience and love of God to people around us because His genes are His body and He is the Head. How can the body be different from the Head?

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  88. I wholeheartedly agree that we are all angry about one thing or another at various times during our day to day life. I love the question of “how do we know whether our anger is considered to be righteous by God.
    Wow! Pastor Tripp has hit something very close to home when he states that our anger is righteous when it is selfless.

    I immediately reflected on a mission project that I lead at my church. We minister to residents of the homeless shelter twice a month. A new member to the team told the residents that she was going to bring them a meal next time we come. As a rule, we simply serve the meal that the shelter cook provides and add dessert. I didn’t want to hurt her feelings or shoot her down since she was totally enthusiastic about it. However, on Monday of the week we are scheduled to serve (Saturday), she notifies me via text message that she cannot come. She said she was sorry but she had a schedule conflict. I WAS ANGRY! I knew that we couldn’t let the people down and I knew that I would be the one who would have to make up the difference. I assured her I would take care of it and gently let her off the hook.

    I was angry because I would have to do something I had not intended to do; make good on her commitment. Well, its all kingdom work and to that I am committed, so I prepared the meal. But Pastor Tripp has spelled out the truth; that righteous anger is NOT self serving. It is manifest through compassion and genuine fruit of the Spirit. I must elevate my heart to the place where I am angry about the hurt that my sisters and brothers are feeling in a world where there’s not enough to go around. I must discern the Lord’s grace in order to defeat the relentless propensity to protect self . Once self is overthrown, grace remains to fight in righteous anger against all injustice. Help me Lord Jesus to discover what to REALLY become angry with/about, and become GOOD AND ANGRY until He comes…to invoke righteous justice once and for all.

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  89. I noticed that not one scripture was referenced in this article. Do you have any Biblical basis for your assertions?

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  90. Powerful words! Thank you for the courageous challenge to be in alignment with what God calls good so that we can express a gracious anger to the hurting world around us.

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  91. I use to be an angry person . But for the last 10 years after my retirement , spent lots of time with scripture reading and devotions , Bible studies I under stood it is Satan’s trap to get a foothold, and praying everyday when I get angry I start singing hymns or walk away saying I agree to disagree . So my mind is not disturbed and the peace is preserved, and no argument , no raising voice .The Holy Spirit is molding me .

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    • My struggle is the same, but I have a hard time thinking that God wants me to walk away when so many of our churches have given in to bad theology and acceptance of sin for the sake of being kind. Don’t you think that some of us shouldn’t keep our mouths shut and just walk away in those instances?

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    • Molly,
      I am glad to hear how God through the Holy Spirit, is shaping your life. May you become an instrument to further God kingdom as others witness your testimony. May God bless the journey you’re on.

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  92. Good to hear that there is righteous anger.

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    • Beautiiful! ..as is the message in this blog.

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  93. Paul David Tripp’s words are incredibly true, convicting, inspiring, and applicable. Thank you!

    I thank God everyday for His love, mercy, and grace and pray for wisdom in being an instrument of each; balancing anger and goodness.

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    • Amen! Righteous anger should propel us to rescue, restore, reconcile and heal.

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  94. Dear Dr. Tripp,

    Thank you for the clarity of righteous anger. It is a convicting and encouraging article. To be good and angry is something that should compel us to God’s compassion and mercy. His heart breaks for the injustice, but He has placed the church (us) to carry out His righteous indignation. We carry out this out in the form of a willing servant.

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  95. May the love of Christ outweigh the hurts and pain that keeps us bound to looking within instead of sharing the fruit of the love received despite the hurts and pain. May these words of Truth allow the righteousness of Christ to rule and reign in our lives be embraced. Teach us Holy Spirit what it means to absolve self and in turn look to You to help others.

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  96. This is such a thought provoking message. I needed every word, but will need to reread it numerous times in order to explain it to someone else. That is the pinnacle of learning. I must ask, have you mastered this Godly anger?

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  97. thank you for your clear, Biblical view on righteous anger. This is a subject of much confusion in the Christian community. I especially love Micah 6:8 as the key verse. this was my husband’s life verse, and it is one that should be committed to memory, shared with others, and especially lived out in our lives each day.

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  98. Very great – reminds me that it is never “THEM” it’s always between me & God.

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  99. I am so grateful for the thought-provoking Blog by one of my favorite authors. Sometimes I feel so inundated with overwhelming evil and suffering in this world that my heart is growing cold and numb – I am not angry enough! Praying for God to tenderize my heart anew, help to to indeed hate what He hates. Please forgive me LORD, for being content in my comfortable bubble and break my heart again for what breaks Yours. In Your unending grace, please give me opportunities to shine Your Light of mercy into the darkness that surrounds!

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  100. How nice that we are allowed to be good and angry; that is not extra angry, but both simultaneosly. However, I find that is only possibly by God’s grace and His Holy Spirit’s help. Thanks for your helpful insights.

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  101. Good and angry….. words to take in deeply and ponder. Thank you Dr Tripp and Thank YOU Holy Spirit!

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  102. Thank you for clarifying what it means to be righteously angry as God is with the injustice and suffering we see around us.
    Thank you that His word calls us to be a healer, restorer, rescuer and a reconciler as we do God’s work daily and are led by His
    Spirit. His wants each of us to heed the call for those who are broken in their desperate need for Jesus.

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  103. Thank you for the clarity of expressing our anger. Convicted of a recent experience.

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  104. Thank you Dr Paul David Tripp for blessing me with wisdom and encouragement.

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  105. Anger and rage was persisting in me ,for all my sufferings despite praying and several attempts of confession and introspection.Anger still wells up at times temptation and near hits to get back are there , something held me back it’s Grace .your perspective throw light on deeper contemplation

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  106. Truly understood the meaning of ‘ righteous anger

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    • Indeed I need God’s grace for me to be good and angry at the same time.

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  107. Thank you very much for this blog and i thank Dr. Paul David Trrip for this wonderful message on righteous anger where I am struggling in this point for several years. I want to get rid of this pls pray for me to overcome my anger.

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    • Sowshilya – praying with you!

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      • Thank you Dr. Paul for this great insight.

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  108. Made me stop and ponder about why I get angry a I am learning the difference between righteous anger and ordinary anger which is the result of my ego.

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    • Wonderful!! So insightful.

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      • Thank you. This is a loving and inspiring exclamation for righteous anger. Excellently presented.

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